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End of a Saga by Ryngs

One Year and One Month ago,

I was forced into a very bad situation. After much suffering, after turning my life and my spirit up side down. Through the tears, fears, and anxieties. Today, that saga has come to an end.

I do NOT have Type II Diabetes.

My Doctor said so him self... One Year and One Month after he told me he was calling an ambulance and going to give me an emergency of insulin, because my Glucose levels where near off the chart. Both of which I forcefully refused. I did however start taking the other meds he prescribed only to suffer a serious set of side effects the following week. So, I stopped taking those. I did changed my diet, and lifestyle however.

Today he said, "I have never said this before, and thought it not possible. You have cured yourself of Type II, and without medications." (Not that I think I ever really had it).

Just felt like sharing. Grin
Ryngs

End of a Saga

Ryngs

14 May 2015 at 15:13:39 MDT

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  • Link

    Yep, people just don't believe it's possible. My grandmother was told repeatedly she wouldn't live another 10 years but surprise, she is still healthy after ignoring all of the doctor's advice and working on her lifestyle and diet. For many people it seems it's just too uncomfortable to think that doctors may have it wrong, and they frequently do.

    • Link

      All the research I have done, states that if caught fairly early (before any major tissue damage), and treated aggressively with medication, exercise, and diet that it can be put into remission. Or, outright cure it.

      I chose not to take the meds, and treated it aggressively with just exercise, and diet. Mainly I cut out all sodas, and sugary drinks, and reduced my processed sugar intake to less then 30 grams a day. My exercise consists of daily to every other day bike riding for 30-40 minutes. With occasional days of 90 minutes. My average is roughly 6-12 miles.

      There is also the possibility I may have a genetic predisposition to handle glucose spikes differently. My family has a tendency for Type II diabetes, yet few ever take the medication or take it seriously. My mother had it for 20 years before she HAD to take meds. She never changed her lifestyle either.

      So, as long as I stay moderately active, and watch how much sugar I eat on a daily basis I should be fine.

      [Grin]

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    Yay!

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      Thank you [Bows]

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    Well congrats on doing well, despite your doctor being right or not.

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      Thank you [Bows]

  • Link

    Lucky you! I have it, not fun and always have to watch what you eat.

    • Link

      All the research I have done, states that if caught fairly early (before any major tissue damage), and treated aggressively with medication, exercise, and diet that it can be put into remission. Or, outright cure it.
      I chose not to take the meds, and treated it aggressively with just exercise, and diet. Mainly I cut out all sodas, and sugary drinks, and reduced my processed sugar intake to less then 30 grams a day. My exercise consists of daily to every other day bike riding for 30-40 minutes. With occasional days of 90 minutes. My average is roughly 6-12 miles.
      There is also the possibility I may have a genetic predisposition to handle glucose spikes differently. My family has a tendency for Type II diabetes, yet few ever take the medication or take it seriously. My mother had it for 20 years before she HAD to take meds. She never changed her lifestyle either.
      So, as long as I stay moderately active, and watch how much sugar I eat on a daily basis I should be fine.
      [Grin]

      • Link

        Well I have sudden onset adult diabetes mostly brought on by stress and diet. The Dr wanted me on insulin immediately but I do NOT do needles! So he told me if I could get it under control with diet (and taking metformin) I would not have to take insulin. In a month I got it under control. I stopped eating carbs almost completely, no sugary dinks, very little bread (unless it is whole grain) etc. But Unfortunately I still have to keep an eye on my blood sugar and it is barely in a safe range most of the time. I don't get enough exorcise (I am not over weight at all) but due to my sudden weight loss when the diabetes hit, I have no muscle mass any more and little energy.

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          The grains are even worse than the sugar. If for instance you're transitioning to a ketogenic diet where your body regains its ability to efficiently burn fat for energy (which bypasses the insulin problem), many people just find it impossible unless they eliminate all gluten and dairy. When your body can't burn fat, it burns your muscles instead which would explain your low muscle mass.

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            The low muscle mass was an effect of the diabetes like my need to pee all the time and my craving of sweets and my eye sight changing. Once I found out I had diabetes and stopped eating the wrong things and got the meds, I have stabilized my weight. But the damage was done. Losing 30 pounds in 4 months was a bad thing!

  • Link

    Hurrah!

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      Yep [Grin]

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    This is great news, but why do you doubt that you ever had type II diabetes if your doctor thought you did?

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      The speed at which I was able to level out my glucose levels, the fact that the type test my Doc uses is/was not approved by the American Diabetes Association, and that test has a possibility of giving false positives. Plus, there is a possibility that my genetics handles Glucose differently. I may have been borderline diabetic when I was diagnosed, and/or having a sugar spike but according to my Doc I should have been in a coma, and possibly organ failure. Yet, I felt fine. Additionally, I had a test just 9 months before, and It came back high normal.

      But then again I may have had, and we caught it really early. Before it start really affecting me, and my family has a tendency to get Diabetes and not treating it for decades and having no ill affects. So, I think my genetics handle the disease differently.

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    Congrats ^_^

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      Thanks [Grin]

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    Excellent news!!

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      Agreed, thank you [Grin]