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SailorX2

Skele Queen / 24 / Female / Midwest Gothic

The Unchosen One
Commissions: Closed
Trades: Sometimes
Requests: Closed

Profile

Artist. Historian. Teacher-in-Training.

A refugee of the Emo-Fringe Era, I live in a state of Midwest Gothic. Generally affable, neutral good. Also a walking history textbook. I could be a good artist if I didn't draw all this anime shit.

Feel free to message me!
I like conversation.

Contact

Art Tumblr
mistakenforexhibit.tumblr.com
Carbonmade
sailorx2.carbonmade.com
DeviantART
sailorx2.deviantart.com
Instagram
instagram.com/sailorx2/
LinkedIn
linkedin.com/pub/alysse-peery/b7/845/865
Media Blog
electric-matryoshka.blogspot.com
Old Art Collection
deskart-archaeology.tumblr.com
Pixiv
pixiv.net/member.php?id=4694058
Twitter
twitter.com/SailorX2a

Latest Journal

The "Rules" of Composition

on 7 August 2015 at 10:51:12 MDT

These are the so-called "rules" of composition as my old photography teacher told me. A good photographer has to be a master of composition, and those same skills can apply to ANY other areas of visual art (which is why I suggest people have some 101 experience in other mediums, even if they don't stick with it). I thought it might be helpful to some people out there to go through these, even if this is just a refresher to something you already know. The last rule is probably the most important though!

[Composition is the way you arrange your subject on a picture plane.]

1) Select a single dominant subject of interest.

2) Place center of interest away from center of picture.

3) Keep the horizon level and place according to the Rule of Thirds.

4) Keep vertical lines parallel to edge of frame.

5) Select a contrasting background so that important parts of your subject don't merge with the background.

6) Fill the frame.

7) Do most of your cropping when you take the picture.

8) Crop or remove extraneous subjects.

9) Don't amputate parts of you main subject in awkward places.

10) Avoid distracting shapes at edges.

11) Have subject facing center or moving into frame.

12) Frame the principle subject with complimentary foreground object.

13) Attract the viewer's attention with leading lines such as converging diagonals or an "s" curve that directs the eye of the composition.

14) Employ strong diagonal lines to imply action or conflict.

15) Compose in a vertical format to emphasize height or dignity, or possible movement. Horizontal formats suggest peace and stability.

16) Remember these "rules", but violate them freely to create a more memorable or stronger image!!

So go out there and make some art! But if you make art exactly like you're teacher or mentor or whatever please remember that last rule - break the rules!
(◕‿◕✿)

If you have any questions ask them down below and presumably someone will answer them eventually.

View This Journal and 0 Comments

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Joined 5 August 2015

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Following

Shouts

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    Haha... here's a belated thanks for the watch!

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    Eyyyyy thanks for the follow there. 8U I hope I'm able to keep making neat junk for you to look at.

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    You have a really pretty style!

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      Aww, shucks!
      You've also got a really nice style too. And some interesting looking characters to boot!

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        Ah! Thanks! (Looks like I gotta start posting again, haha! Thanks for giving me a reason to)

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    Thanks for a follow!

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      Of course! You've got a really nice colouring style and I'm interested to see more of it! (´ ▽ ` )ノ